Adorably Random

dustinmathisen:

ptgreat:

nickcarragay:

petition to make young adult authors stop writing about girls whose lives change when they meet a boy

When she saw him time slowed to a stop.  He was so perfect and she knew her life would never be the same because she had finally found him.  The one.  The first boy she would ever kill.

image

simonsprocket:

ruinedchildhood:

Drive Through

Instructions unclear

simonsprocket:

ruinedchildhood:

Drive Through

Instructions unclear

lightspeedsound:

becca-morley:

adventures in school

I can tell these are all high schooler stories because there’s nothing about professors getting drunk with you

fullcravings:

The Best Pumpkin Cream Cheese-Filled Brownies
squidkneee:

My college is cute

squidkneee:

My college is cute

booooost:

spaceexp:

What it would look like if the Orion Nebula was a distance of 4 light years away.

i’m game

booooost:

spaceexp:

What it would look like if the Orion Nebula was a distance of 4 light years away.

i’m game

cas-the-pumpkin-king:

zhgirlonfire:

Ok fine, you win. John was an asshole

jesus christ, i both laughed and cried at how accurate this was

my-teen-quote:

Click for black & white quotes/GIFS
tamorapierce:

taibhsearachd:

fatassvegan:

boo-author:

starklyinaccurate:

crohns-sucks:

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

If nothing else, this post needs to be seen around the internet more. This harassment is not okay and no one should have to deal with it on top of having an invisible illness. This is just another form of anonymous bullying to add to the internet bullying these TROLLS are capable of.
If you are healthy, please reblog.If you are sick, please reblog.If you have a disability, please reblog.If you have an invisible illness, please reblog.If you know someone with a disability, please reblog.If you are a human being, please reblog.Let’s spread the word and help those of us that may not look like it. 
Ignorance isn’t bliss, ignorance is ignorance. 

And people ask me why I am afraid to use my cane in public.Being disabled, visibly so is always dangerous

When I got my first cane and posted about it, I had people demanding to know why I thought I “deserved” it at my age.
That was the word.
"Deserved".

This is the kind of bullshit that made my dad, a man who dealt with crippling pain from degenerative disc disorder, afraid to apply for handicapped parking
I remember saying to him that he could get handicapped plates and hearing him say that it wasn’t “bad enough” as I watched him wince and hobble as he walked from the back of the parking lot
People internalize these ideas, even handicapped people, that’s why this is so fucking important

I use a cane when I’m outside because of fatigue and balance issues. It helps me stay on my feet longer and not fall over. I get dirty looks and rude stares literally every time I’m around strangers, because I’m not (usually) visually limping, because I’m not putting my weight on it 100% of the time, because I’m too young to look like I need it. Because obviously my cheap-ass not-pretty-at-all cane is a fashion statement, or a ploy for attention, or something. People are terrible.

I was flying recently with a friend, and we had all kinds of fun traveling.  We had been on the tarmac a while and were told we’d been on it another while when she checked her blood sugar and realized it was going down fast.  (She had thought she would be good until beverage service, not realizing we would be bumped to #7 in the takeoff queue twice.)  She asked the hostess for a drink, explaining her reasons, and the hostess, being a very nice person, brought her a snack box as well.  A little later my friend heard the women in the seat across from us to the rear tell each other she had just “pretended” to be diabetic to get the snack box that she hadn’t even asked for.  I wanted to punch them.

tamorapierce:

taibhsearachd:

fatassvegan:

boo-author:

starklyinaccurate:

crohns-sucks:

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

If nothing else, this post needs to be seen around the internet more. This harassment is not okay and no one should have to deal with it on top of having an invisible illness. This is just another form of anonymous bullying to add to the internet bullying these TROLLS are capable of.

If you are healthy, please reblog.
If you are sick, please reblog.
If you have a disability, please reblog.
If you have an invisible illness, please reblog.
If you know someone with a disability, please reblog.
If you are a human being, please reblog.

Let’s spread the word and help those of us that may not look like it. 

Ignorance isn’t bliss, ignorance is ignorance. 

And people ask me why I am afraid to use my cane in public.

Being disabled, visibly so is always dangerous

When I got my first cane and posted about it, I had people demanding to know why I thought I “deserved” it at my age.

That was the word.

"Deserved".

This is the kind of bullshit that made my dad, a man who dealt with crippling pain from degenerative disc disorder, afraid to apply for handicapped parking

I remember saying to him that he could get handicapped plates and hearing him say that it wasn’t “bad enough” as I watched him wince and hobble as he walked from the back of the parking lot

People internalize these ideas, even handicapped people, that’s why this is so fucking important

I use a cane when I’m outside because of fatigue and balance issues. It helps me stay on my feet longer and not fall over. I get dirty looks and rude stares literally every time I’m around strangers, because I’m not (usually) visually limping, because I’m not putting my weight on it 100% of the time, because I’m too young to look like I need it. Because obviously my cheap-ass not-pretty-at-all cane is a fashion statement, or a ploy for attention, or something. People are terrible.

I was flying recently with a friend, and we had all kinds of fun traveling.  We had been on the tarmac a while and were told we’d been on it another while when she checked her blood sugar and realized it was going down fast.  (She had thought she would be good until beverage service, not realizing we would be bumped to #7 in the takeoff queue twice.)  She asked the hostess for a drink, explaining her reasons, and the hostess, being a very nice person, brought her a snack box as well.  A little later my friend heard the women in the seat across from us to the rear tell each other she had just “pretended” to be diabetic to get the snack box that she hadn’t even asked for.  I wanted to punch them.